Joel Houston on FOXnews

Video

http://video.foxnews.com/v/2296942312001/hillsong-united-preaching-faith-worldwide-/?playlist_id=2296942312001

Joel Houston on how his church is making huge waves using music to spread a message.

I wrote my final paper on Hillsong United last year.  Interesting how something like that is now mainstream news.  It’s cool to be ahead of the curve.

You can read my paper here.

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It’s been a while…

I haven’t blogged in a while.

Self-reflection is a practice that is heavily stressed in Teacher’s College – to the point where its value is often depreciated.  Many complain.

But today was the second day in a row where I took time to listen to music for the sake of listening.  As a musician and music student teacher, I rarely make time to enjoy or use music as therapy (un-wind, relax, comfort) and I seem to forget how affective and wonderful it is to listen to music.

I have a forty-five minute subway ride back downtown from my teaching placement and its been refreshing to listen to Iron and Wine’s Our Endless Numbered Days these past two days.  Soft guitar playing and relaxing melodies with the occasional heavier bluesy track, it has brought peace and calm to my busy and restless heart and mind.

Writing reflections on my day in this mood is a very effective use of my time.

Take some time to listen to what you need to.  Take some time to reflect.

A Thought on Excessiveness:

Quote

We should remain within the limits imposed by our basic needs and strive with all our power not to exceed them. For once we are carried a little beyond these limits in our desire for the pleasures of life, there is then no criterion by which to check our onward movement, since no bounds can be set to that which exceeds the necessary.

– Fifth-century monk Nilus of Ancyra

I am regularly inspired by the thoughts of “ancient” folks.

I remember being humbled in a grade 11 English class when my teacher posed the question of whether we thought of ourselves as more intelligent or knowledgeable than people in ages past.  We have different knowledge, not a greater knowledge.

Nilus here is talking about living simply.  Something that is often thought of as faddish.  But it is something that I strive for.  I like his observation that there is no way to gauge excessiveness — anything beyond the limits of our basic needs is excessive.

Why We Eat Together (Shane Claiborne, Chris Haw, Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove)

I recently ordered the book The Awakening of Hope: Why We Practice a Common Faith by Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, and I haven’t gotten to reading it yet, but this video series looks great and I can’t wait to start reading it.

DESCRIPTION:
In session 1 of 6 from the Awakening of Hope: Why We Practice a Common Faith video series, Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, Chris Haw and Shane Claiborne invite us to reflect on the role of food and how it’s reflected and lived out in our Kingdom stories.

The Human Race and the Body of Christ

Aside

We know the Human Race.
We know the Body of Christ.

Are we as a church, aware of our body?
Each of its members, all of the parts, the structure and interdependence of it all, its flexibility and ability to grow.

Could we describe humanity as a community or body?
Could we describe the church as a community or body?

Is the world in chaos.  Are we literally a race to be alive today?  A race for comfort, health, supremacy, safety.

Does the church reflect this “race”?

Or, are we as a church, an actual community, an actual body.

How Healthy is the world.
How healthy are we?

Summer Time

Well.. it’s now August 9th, and:

I’ve had a summer that started with a road trip, followed by a 3 week internship at a High School (music classroom helping), and now I’ve got a month left of working at a tractor dealership (which has lent my name to being published in a local periodical).

I’m at the point where I’m stoked to go to Toronto for school and meet up with all my school compadres.  Yet, I know I’m going to miss looking out at 6 acres of peaches out the window and living at home.

Working in the shipping/receiving and parts department of a tractor dealership has been a mostly unrewarding job.  There’s not much to look forward to… other than some very hilariously inappropriate comments and incredibly creative uses of curse words by the mechanics (one in particular).

Moving to and living in Toronto will be really great.  I’m joining MoveIn – intentional Christian community living in poor and densely populated areas.  I’ll be living with 2 other guys in an apartment in St. Jamestown, and we’re part of a ‘Patch’ that includes another 2-3 girls who will be living in an apartment nearby.  We’ll meet for weekly prayer meetings, and be a presence in the community.  (I will be blogging about this soon, and will give much more detail).

I also might be doing an internship at a church in Oakville.  We shall see… updates to come.

Response to: A more knowable Other

This post is a response to Popular Christianity: Popular Culture?‘s post: “A more knowable Other“.

The concept of negotiating what makes us human through looking at representations of human beings with grotesque tendencies is brilliant.  These characters – like Hannibal Lecter – are certainly monsters in a psychological sense.

To say that they are more powerful than monsters for the purposes of negotiating our humanness, in a narrative, might be taking it too far – I would say they are a powerful example, but that they only fulfil another type of monster in the repertoire of monsters.

The intelligent, alive, and psychologically disturbed human-monster (or inhumane-human) represents the monstrous potential within a person extremely well; the Other is almost as close as it gets to us.  On an intrapersonal level, this type of monster is extremely effective, it indeed resonates deeply.

Outside of this, vampires look pretty human-like, zombies less so, and ghosts aren’t even physical [Aside: I think the black smoke monster (or The Man in Black) from LOST would prove to be an interesting artefact: ghost-like and physical (morphing), immortal and supernatural, immune to death, and longing for freedom (that ultimately leads to an unwanted death)].  But, my point is that though human-monsters are an effective example, the vampire and zombie (ghost and mummy) lead us to question our humanity in different ways.

I am now seriously addicted to this show...

Zombies, more specifically zombie apocalypses (apocali?), like in The Walking Dead, lead us to question our humanity: will we retain our humanity in a fight for survival? how will people relate to one another in dire circumstance? will we retain a sanctity of life? what is the purpose of life? etc.

The inhuman-human, human-monster, or human being with grotesque tendencies, whatever it be called, is a welcome addition to the list of monsters.