All U of T students have access to free copies of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook)

So, I’m sorry if this isn’t new to you, but it is to me.  I’ve already finished an undergrad (plus OISE) and have now started a masters degree at U of T.  During this time, the mail server changed (we now have @mail.utoronto.com email addresses) to a Microsoft based online version of Outlook – which has at been visual improvement.

But to cut to the chase…

We have access to Office 365 – an online version of Outlook, Calendar, People, OneDrive, Tasks, Word Online, Excel Online, PowerPoint Online, and OneNote Online.  This is useful when making small adjustments, or viewing an attachment.  To access this just click “Office 365” when you are logged into http://www.mail.utoronto.ca

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HOWEVER! most of us do the bulk of our writing on programs/apps “offline”.

I’ve been rocking my 2008 Mac version since the start of my undergrad (and have been using Pages for the past couple years… then converting to .docx when professors can’t handle .pdfs).

See the “Install Office on more devices”? (on the screenshot above)

You can install Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook all onto your Mac or PC by clicking Install.

It really is that easy.  All you need is your UTORid and password.

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“One ironic example is our talk of Scripture as ‘the Word of God’ … The scriptural word for Scripture is Scripture.”

Quote

James Barr’s Fundamentalism contains its misapprehensions about evangelicalism but also its penetrating insights, and one of the latter is this criticism, that for evangelicalism the Bible often has the form of authority but not the reality.  Doctrinally we are committed to a theology of the Word, but precisely that commitment can hinder us from actually being a people of the Word, because the fact that we accept that theoretical commitment provides us with a false sense of security, as if it guaranteed a real commitment to scripture.  The result is that it does the opposite.  We love to tag texts onto things, as if that made them biblical.  One ironic example is our talk of Scripture as “the Word of God”; in Scripture, phrases such as “the word of God” or “the word of truth” are not used to refer to Scripture.  The scriptural word for Scripture is Scripture.

John Goldingay, Key Questions about Biblical Interpretation, pp. 104-105.